Category Archives: Recipes and hints

Micro Greens for All

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Micro Greens are lush and varied. Packed with nutrition these baby plants are versitile. They can be put on sandwiches, added to salads (or make them a salad by themselves), used in smoothies, stir fried, added as garnish to dishes and the list goes on. Thanks to Joby and Ricky at What’s Up Farm for getting us started on these fun additions to our farmers market display.

Pumpkin soup

Galeaux d’Eysines, that warty pumpkin we have at the markets this month has a unique flavor and makes great soup or pie. We have begun slicing this pumpkin and the other large, soup pumpkins, Musquee de Provence and Marina di Chioggia, into smaller portions for individual recipes. It’s getting toward the end of our other squashes especially Delicata and Butternut. Branch out and try a Kabocha Winter Sweet variety or Speckled Hound. Come to the market and get them before they’re gone.

 

This is also know as the Cinderella pumpkin.
This is also know as the Cinderella pumpkin.

http://www.bunkycooks.com/2010/10/french-pumpkin-soup/

Celery salad

Who needs lettuce?
Who needs lettuce?

This crisp, succulent salad was made with fresh ingredients from the farm. Celery with some of the leaves adds a slight bitter-sweet taste. Add to that the savory spring onions, peppery radishes and sweet carrots and top with a green garlic vinaigrette and you have a wonderful salad. Who needs lettuce? Our supply of celery and radishes are running low, get them now before they’re gone!

What do I do with…?

quinceAs many of you have discovered we are now featuring fall produce from both my sister’s farm in the foothills, Burgeson Family Farm, and from our farm. My sister, Dayna, and her husband, Adrian, grow wonderful Satsuma mandarins which will be here before Thanksgiving but they also grow a variety of citrus and unusual fruits. This week we have; Kaffir limes, Bearss limes, key limes, quince, Fuyu persimmons and pomegranates from their farm.

We have tomatoes, tomatillos, melons, butternut squash, spaghetti squash, potimarron squash, sucrine du berry squash, golden and green acorn squash, baby blue hubbard squash, New England pie pumpkins, Jack-o-lantern pumpkins, Tuscan (dinosaur) kale, Winterbor kale, Portugese Trochunda kale, Swiss chard, Marvielle de 4 seasons lettuce, Gentelina lettuce, a small amount of summer squash including Trombetta de Albenga and eggs from our small flock of pasture raised, organically fed chickens.

So what do you do with…Quince

Leave it to Martha Stewart to come up with a seasonal produce guide with not only quince recipes but recipes for persimmons, pomegranates, pumpkins and more. Here is the link: http://www.marthastewart.com/274208/quince-recipes/@center/276955/seasonal-produce-recipe-guide

 

This Week’s Markets July 7th through July 13 Tomatoes and Basil!!!

 

Tomatoes
Tomatoes

Tomatoes and basil, the sweet harbingers of summer. We left for the nation’s Independence Day to enjoy a visit on the lake with our grandchildren and daughter and son-in-law and returned to an explosion of tomatoes and beautiful basil. Time for some amazing bruschetta with some bread from the markets and our garlic, tomatoes and basil. Come visit us at the Glen Ellen market on Sunday from 10-2, the Petaluma Eastside Market on Tuesday from 10-1:30 and the  Fairfax Farmers Market on Wednesday from 4-8pm.

This Week’s Markets, June 25-June 30th Summer Farro Salad

summer farro salad   

In spite of the rain we were at the Petaluma Eastside farmers market Tuesday. We had a limited number of tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, cucumbers (both Persian and Lemon), an abundance of summer squash, zucchini, some chard, lots of Dinosaur Kale, Purple kohlrabi, garlic, beets and of course our delicious honey. See you at the Glen Ellen market this Sunday, June 30th.

My sister, Dayna, has posted a delicious zucchini recipe, Summer Farro Salad,  on her blog. http://californiamediterraneandiet.com Looks delicious doesn’t it?

Frozen Eggs?

3808130964_b138b94747Did you know that these luscious, pasture-raised eggs are a seasonal product like our vine ripened tomatoes? As the days shorten in the fall, unless artificial light is provided, our hens slow down their egg laying. At a time when many of us are gearing up for holiday baking these eggs become scarce as hens teeth (hee, hee). Plan for this shortage now and freeze eggs for the winter.

How To Freeze Eggs

Eggs can be frozen, but not in the shell!

It’s best to freeze eggs in small quantities so you can thaw only what you need. An easy way to do this is to put them in an ice cube tray. Once frozen, transfer them to a freezer container and label.

As with any frozen food, it is best to thaw eggs in the refrigerator and use them as soon as they are thawed. Only use thawed eggs in dishes that will be thoroughly cooked.


Following are some easy instructions for freezing eggs:

Whole Eggs: To freeze whole eggs or yolks crack them into a bowl and gently stir to break up the yolk somewhat. Try not to incorporate air into the eggs. Label the container with the date and the number of eggs. They can be kept frozen for a year, and should be thawed in the refrigerator the day before you intend to use them.

Egg Yolks: To inhibit yolks from getting lumpy during storage, stir in a 1/2-teaspoon salt per 1-cup of egg or yolks. If using for desserts, use 1-tablespoon sugar or corn syrup per 1-cup yolks or whole eggs. Label the container with the date and the number of egg yolks. Use up extra egg yolks in recipes like sauces, custards, ice cream, yellow cakes, mayonnaise, scrambled eggs, and cooked puddings.

Egg Whites: Raw egg whites do not suffer from freezing (cooked egg whites are very rubbery). No salt or sugar is needed. Break and separate the eggs one at a time, making sure that no yolk gets into the whites. Pour into trays and freeze until firm. Label the container with the date and the number of egg whites. Use up extra egg whites in boiled frostings (i.e., 7-minute frosting), meringue cookies, angel food cake, white cakes, or meringue for pies.

Hard-Cook Egg Yolks: Hard-cooked egg yolks can be frozen to use later for toppings or garnishes. Carefully place the yolks in a single layer in a saucepan and add enough water to come at least 1-inch above the yolks. Cover and quickly bring just to boiling. Remove from the heat and let stand, covered, in the hot water about 15 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon, drain well and package for freezing.

Hard-cooked whole eggs and whites become tough and watery when frozen, so don’t freeze them.

 


Egg Conversions:

These approximations are based on a large (2-oz) egg. Other egg sizes may be more or less than the amounts listed below.

Whole Eggs
3 whole eggs = 1/2 cup
1 whole egg = 3 tablespoons
1/2 whole egg = 4 teaspoons

Yolks
6-7 yolks = 1/2 cup
1 yolk = 1 tablespoon

Whites
4-6 whites = 1/2 cup
1 white = 2 tablespoons

Dried Eggs
1 egg = 2 tablespoons egg powder + 2-1/2 tablespoons water

 

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Eggs/FreezingEgg.htm